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20121202
20121210
Search Results 0 to 4 of about 5 (some duplicates have been removed)
i call the invisible religions. lessons to teach the world. tavis: how do this to stand in their version religions play themselves out? >> yes, a very good question. look at somalia. look at more tanya. -- and more tanya -- look at another country. we would have thought africa is immune. in many ways, african religions, the world views, the perceptions have managed. the extremism in parts of the world, costing billions of lives, literally, in is time to remind africans of some of the ways of managing and also to tell the world. if that happens in other parts of the world, it affects africa sooner or later. tavis: do i detect in what you just said a critique of africa and being complicit in some of this stuff? >> of course. i am not pretending to write about africa in general. what is useful to the coming generations and the world. inevitably, and african- americans. we must also come to terms with our past and stop romanticizing certain features, including activities of africans, said that is just one of the things. tavis: yes. to the point you made a moment ago, i am al
with or without one. probably better with one. although, there are great problems with freedom of religion, freedom of association, freedom of the press, freedom of rights for women. it will have to be improved upon. >> this is where political will and puritanism will be enshrined. >> will these various players compete to monopolize? that has been their experience and tradition going back tomorrow. or will this competition and tension actually produce respect for the roles of these institutions and compromise? something that they are clearly going to have to try to figure out. >> and you can see it even with americans in capitol hill. what are your thoughts about how this will work out? >> if you are a glass is half full, the institutional society right now is the muslim brotherhood, but you have an opposition that has been reenergize. the key is, can they become organized? you have to step back from a violent confrontation to work on political grounds. >> a quick correction to the story on syria last night. i mistakenly said that assad's father used chemical weapons against his own people
is not religion, not geography, who has the right to decide the line. we are going to be fighting over water. >> it is a sustainable item. tavis: who controls the water sources? into the fray comes this wonderful project, "a dark truth." i will let you explain the character you play, then i want to get into the film. so many real-life issues run through this movie. i want to bounce back and forth, if i can. >> the character jack, at the beginning of the film, is a radio host in toronto. the show is called "the truth." he is trying to bring attention to situations in society that are untruthful. , but his past is one that is very dark. if he was involved in the cia he says in the movie that he has done things that are unforgivable and unforgettable. he is trying to get amends -- somehow make amends for that in his life. it is an impossible thing to do. according to the things he did -- he will never be able to make amends. but at least he has to try. thrown into this emotional baggage this character has comes this issue that has to do with forrest whitacker and eva longoria's character. forre
, they belong to religions and it will guarantee the security needs and interest of if state of israel and the palestinians. but this is a dramatic change from what barack was doing and it certainly is different from any other idea that came up through the years so i can say that barak under the influence of president clinton did a great deal but the in the end they messed it up primarily because of the reluctance of yasser arafat to make any agreement. i never believed arafat will make any agreement because he was a terrorist. there is a big difference between him and abbas. mahmoud abbas, while he was with yasser arafat said officially and publicly and officially that he was against terror when arafat was conducting terror against the state of israel. so i think abbas was the best possible partner for a peace agreement. he and p.m. fayyad were doing many dramatic changes in the way that the administration of the palestinians is handled in the west bank which are very positive much beyond what most people anticipated that they could do. so they have to get credit and i think they are
Search Results 0 to 4 of about 5 (some duplicates have been removed)